How Does the Sun Appear on Other Planets?

To avoid any confusion, the little spaceship seen in each frame is irrelevant to the message. I believe the original designer put them there to help establish how much light the sun generates on each planet. (Each comparison was based on the approximate apparent visual magnitude of the sun for each planet)

letsdolaunch:

we-are-star-stuff:

Opportunity passes Russia for off-Earth driving record [via @MarsCuriosity]

phew!

WOW! That rover has been amazingly resilient. It was only expected to last like 3-months when the mission began. 

(via asapscience)

crookedindifference:

Happy 56th Anniversary NASA
crookedindifference:

Happy 56th Anniversary NASA
crookedindifference:

Happy 56th Anniversary NASA
crookedindifference:

Happy 56th Anniversary NASA
crookedindifference:

Happy 56th Anniversary NASA
crookedindifference:

Happy 56th Anniversary NASA
crookedindifference:

Happy 56th Anniversary NASA
crookedindifference:

Happy 56th Anniversary NASA
crookedindifference:

Happy 56th Anniversary NASA
crookedindifference:

Happy 56th Anniversary NASA
micdotcom:

The crisis in Gaza is so serious, it can be seen from space

International Space Station astronaut Alexander Gerst has posted his “saddest photo yet.” From all the way up in the thermosphere, ISS personnel orbiting 200 miles over the Middle East can see bombs and missiles exploding in Gaza and Israel as the two sides go to war.
Detailed explanation of the photo | Follow micdotcom 


This latest crisis is so disappointing.  micdotcom:

The crisis in Gaza is so serious, it can be seen from space

International Space Station astronaut Alexander Gerst has posted his “saddest photo yet.” From all the way up in the thermosphere, ISS personnel orbiting 200 miles over the Middle East can see bombs and missiles exploding in Gaza and Israel as the two sides go to war.
Detailed explanation of the photo | Follow micdotcom 


This latest crisis is so disappointing. 

micdotcom:

The crisis in Gaza is so serious, it can be seen from space

International Space Station astronaut Alexander Gerst has posted his “saddest photo yet.” From all the way up in the thermosphere, ISS personnel orbiting 200 miles over the Middle East can see bombs and missiles exploding in Gaza and Israel as the two sides go to war.

Detailed explanation of the photo | Follow micdotcom 

This latest crisis is so disappointing. 

(via heythereuniverse)

Chandra Observatory: 15 Years of Glorious Pictures

This is one of those rare slide-shows that is worth your time. All the pictures are just great. 

futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper. 

futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.

pbh3:

The planets, aligned.

This one is a keeper. 

The James Webb Space Telescope described by Peter Cullen (by NASA)

A short video that answers the question: Why is NASA building the James Webb Telescope? 

colchrishadfield:

We are stardust, made of the stuff of dying suns. NASA simulates our basic building blocks. Scientists at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California have developed a way of recreating the dust and gas found around dying red giant stars that eventually become planet-forming interstellar dust.: http://www.gizmag.com/interstellar-dust-planet-formation-nasa/31957/

This is such a fascinating research project. Who knew we could gleam such fascinating insights from humble dust grains? 

Check out some cool time-Lapse animations that show the positions of all the confirmed supernovas, Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and Pulsars known to modern researchers.

[via @AstroKatie]

The Best Astronomy Photos of 2014 from the Astronomical League

In honor of Astronomy Day on Saturday, TIME teamed up with the Astronomical League to publish the umbrella organization’s top photographs on the year.

Wonderful pictures. This is one of those rare slideshows on the web that is really worth your time. 

“It’s truly astonishing that a structure so huge, so vast—it stretches more than three-fourths of the distance from the Earth to the Moon!—can be so ethereally thin. But that’s physics at work.”
— Phil Plait puts the thinness of Saturn Rings in context: Saturn’s rings: To scale, thinner than paper.

Right now NASA — still arguably the leader in space exploration among world agencies — receives a little over 0.4 percent of every U.S. tax dollar. Less than half a penny. That’s what NASA explores the Solar System with, what makes our knowledge of the Universe — from the farthest visible reaches right down to our own planet Earth — even possible. What if NASA were to receive a full one percent? A whole penny from every dollar? That’d still be only a quarter of what NASA worked with to put men on the Moon in 1969, but it’d be more than double what it gets now.

Please spread the message Science fans. 

How do Astronauts take pictures of Earth from the International Space Station?

Here’s your answer: Chris Hadfield’s Snapshots from Space (by canadianspaceagency)