Chandra Observatory: 15 Years of Glorious Pictures

This is one of those rare slide-shows that is worth your time. All the pictures are just great. 

futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper. 

futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.

pbh3:

The planets, aligned.

This one is a keeper. 

The James Webb Space Telescope described by Peter Cullen (by NASA)

A short video that answers the question: Why is NASA building the James Webb Telescope? 

colchrishadfield:

We are stardust, made of the stuff of dying suns. NASA simulates our basic building blocks. Scientists at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California have developed a way of recreating the dust and gas found around dying red giant stars that eventually become planet-forming interstellar dust.: http://www.gizmag.com/interstellar-dust-planet-formation-nasa/31957/

This is such a fascinating research project. Who knew we could gleam such fascinating insights from humble dust grains? 

Check out some cool time-Lapse animations that show the positions of all the confirmed supernovas, Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and Pulsars known to modern researchers.

[via @AstroKatie]

The Best Astronomy Photos of 2014 from the Astronomical League

In honor of Astronomy Day on Saturday, TIME teamed up with the Astronomical League to publish the umbrella organization’s top photographs on the year.

Wonderful pictures. This is one of those rare slideshows on the web that is really worth your time. 

“It’s truly astonishing that a structure so huge, so vast—it stretches more than three-fourths of the distance from the Earth to the Moon!—can be so ethereally thin. But that’s physics at work.”
— Phil Plait puts the thinness of Saturn Rings in context: Saturn’s rings: To scale, thinner than paper.

Right now NASA — still arguably the leader in space exploration among world agencies — receives a little over 0.4 percent of every U.S. tax dollar. Less than half a penny. That’s what NASA explores the Solar System with, what makes our knowledge of the Universe — from the farthest visible reaches right down to our own planet Earth — even possible. What if NASA were to receive a full one percent? A whole penny from every dollar? That’d still be only a quarter of what NASA worked with to put men on the Moon in 1969, but it’d be more than double what it gets now.

Please spread the message Science fans. 

How do Astronauts take pictures of Earth from the International Space Station?

Here’s your answer: Chris Hadfield’s Snapshots from Space (by canadianspaceagency)

For Hubble’s 24th Birthday: A Stellar Nursery Being Destroyed By the Stars It Created

The image marking the 24th anniversary of the iconic space telescope is absoultely gorgeous and as always Phil Plait is the best at explaining the science behind these images. 

asapscience:

Astronomers have revealed some exciting new constellations, specifically for city dwellers. Check ‘em out! 

Gemma Correll

Hahahaha! Constellations fit for the modern, hectic age. 

jtotheizzoe:

Earth From Orbit - Happy Earth Day

Thank you NASA. I’m glad you’re up there looking out for all of us, whether its Cassini gazing back from Saturn at our pale blue dot, or the fleet of Earth-observing satellites that help us learn more about our one and only home.

Such a great video. I bet this will inspire a few kids to take up science as a career. 

Today’s random fact of day comes via kidsneedscience:

When designing the Shuttle program, NASA was looking for a word to signify reliability, cost savings and re-usability.  The noun shuttle entered English first, in the mid-14th century to signify a weaving tool, from Old English scytel meaning a dart or arrow.  A hundred years later the verb shuttle arrived meaning to move back and forth quickly or to move rapidly to and fro, no doubt taken from the speedy action of the shuttle in use during weaving.  It did not acquire the modern sense of to move via a shuttle service until the advent of buses and public transportation.  NASA began using the word around 1969 as they began working on the Shuttle program.  Interestingly, the word rocket also derives from weaving:  the word rocket entered English in 1610 from the Italian word rocchetto, meaning a bobbin or spool head.  The Italian root probably derived from a Germanic root such as rocko with the same meaning.  The word was first used in English to describe a device propelled by a rocket engine in 1919. 
Image of the STS-1 Launch and crew courtesy NASA.
Today’s random fact of day comes via kidsneedscience:

When designing the Shuttle program, NASA was looking for a word to signify reliability, cost savings and re-usability.  The noun shuttle entered English first, in the mid-14th century to signify a weaving tool, from Old English scytel meaning a dart or arrow.  A hundred years later the verb shuttle arrived meaning to move back and forth quickly or to move rapidly to and fro, no doubt taken from the speedy action of the shuttle in use during weaving.  It did not acquire the modern sense of to move via a shuttle service until the advent of buses and public transportation.  NASA began using the word around 1969 as they began working on the Shuttle program.  Interestingly, the word rocket also derives from weaving:  the word rocket entered English in 1610 from the Italian word rocchetto, meaning a bobbin or spool head.  The Italian root probably derived from a Germanic root such as rocko with the same meaning.  The word was first used in English to describe a device propelled by a rocket engine in 1919. 
Image of the STS-1 Launch and crew courtesy NASA.

Today’s random fact of day comes via kidsneedscience:

When designing the Shuttle program, NASA was looking for a word to signify reliability, cost savings and re-usability.  The noun shuttle entered English first, in the mid-14th century to signify a weaving tool, from Old English scytel meaning a dart or arrow.  A hundred years later the verb shuttle arrived meaning to move back and forth quickly or to move rapidly to and fro, no doubt taken from the speedy action of the shuttle in use during weaving.  It did not acquire the modern sense of to move via a shuttle service until the advent of buses and public transportation.  NASA began using the word around 1969 as they began working on the Shuttle program.  Interestingly, the word rocket also derives from weaving:  the word rocket entered English in 1610 from the Italian word rocchetto, meaning a bobbin or spool head.  The Italian root probably derived from a Germanic root such as rocko with the same meaning.  The word was first used in English to describe a device propelled by a rocket engine in 1919. 

Image of the STS-1 Launch and crew courtesy NASA.