Reticent

Posts tagged “Science”

My third submission to SciNote.ORG is about living and doing Science at a south pole research station. 
Have to say that the Editor who worked with me on this piece did a really awesome job of embellishing my original work. 
scinote:

What is it like to live and do science at a South-Pole research station?

Can you imagine living in the frigid and utterly desolate environment of the South Pole for nearly 11 months? Well, we can’t either, but Jason Gallicchio, a postdoctoral researcher at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, has done it.
Gallicchio, an associate fellow for the Kavli Insitute of Physics at the University of Chicago, is part of an astrophysics experiment at the South Pole Telescope. He knows all about the challenges of building and maintaining such a complex scientific instrument in one of the most unforgiving places on the planet. Gallacchio was primarily responsible for the telescope’s data acquisition and software systems, and he also occasionally assisted with some maintenance work.
You might ask why anyone would even put a telescope in such a hostile environment in the first place. It’s not an accident, I promise! Actually, placing the telescope at the South Pole minimizes the interference from the Earth’s atmosphere. One of the primary objectives of the South Pole Telescope is to precisely measure temperature variations in the cosmic microwave background, and getting such precise measurements requires the telescope to be put in a high, dry, and atmospherically stable site. 
The South Pole Telescope is 10 meters across and weighs 280 tons. Researchers use this telescope to study cosmic microwave background radiation (or CMB, as it’s often affectionately called), hoping to uncover hints about the early days of our universe.
As Erik M. Leitch of the University of Chicago explains, CMB is a sort of faint glow of light that fills the universe, falling on Earth from every direction with nearly uniform intensity. It is the residual heat of creation—the afterglow of the Big Bang—streaming through space in these last 14 billion years, like the heat from a sun-warmed rock, re-radiated at night. 
Click here to read more about life at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.
You can learn even more about the topics discussed in this summary at the links below: 
Amundsen-Scott South Pole StationA brief introduction to the Electromagnetic spectrumCosmic microwave backgroundA day in the life of South Pole TelescopeBig Science With The South Pole Telescope

Submitted by Srikar D, Discoverer.
Edited by Jessica F.

My third submission to SciNote.ORG is about living and doing Science at a south pole research station.

Have to say that the Editor who worked with me on this piece did a really awesome job of embellishing my original work. 

scinote:

What is it like to live and do science at a South-Pole research station?

Can you imagine living in the frigid and utterly desolate environment of the South Pole for nearly 11 months? Well, we can’t either, but Jason Gallicchio, a postdoctoral researcher at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, has done it.

Gallicchio, an associate fellow for the Kavli Insitute of Physics at the University of Chicago, is part of an astrophysics experiment at the South Pole Telescope. He knows all about the challenges of building and maintaining such a complex scientific instrument in one of the most unforgiving places on the planet. Gallacchio was primarily responsible for the telescope’s data acquisition and software systems, and he also occasionally assisted with some maintenance work.

You might ask why anyone would even put a telescope in such a hostile environment in the first place. It’s not an accident, I promise! Actually, placing the telescope at the South Pole minimizes the interference from the Earth’s atmosphere. One of the primary objectives of the South Pole Telescope is to precisely measure temperature variations in the cosmic microwave background, and getting such precise measurements requires the telescope to be put in a high, dry, and atmospherically stable site. 

The South Pole Telescope is 10 meters across and weighs 280 tons. Researchers use this telescope to study cosmic microwave background radiation (or CMB, as it’s often affectionately called), hoping to uncover hints about the early days of our universe.

As Erik M. Leitch of the University of Chicago explains, CMB is a sort of faint glow of light that fills the universe, falling on Earth from every direction with nearly uniform intensity. It is the residual heat of creation—the afterglow of the Big Bang—streaming through space in these last 14 billion years, like the heat from a sun-warmed rock, re-radiated at night. 

Click here to read more about life at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.

You can learn even more about the topics discussed in this summary at the links below: 

Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station
A brief introduction to the Electromagnetic spectrum
Cosmic microwave background
A day in the life of South Pole Telescope
Big Science With The South Pole Telescope

Submitted by Srikar D, Discoverer.

Edited by Jessica F.

science-junkie:

Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country
If global carbon emissions continue on current trends and sea levels are affected by climate change about as much as expected, about 2.6 percent of the global population (about 177 million people) will be living in a place at risk of regular flooding.
Read more and check the interactive map @nytimes.com

Climate Change poses a threat to all of humanity and yet, we as whole are failing in our duty to do anything about it because we all have our lives to live, don’t we? 
See Also: Why our brains are wired to ignore climate change and what to do about it

science-junkie:

Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country

If global carbon emissions continue on current trends and sea levels are affected by climate change about as much as expected, about 2.6 percent of the global population (about 177 million people) will be living in a place at risk of regular flooding.

Read more and check the interactive map @nytimes.com

Climate Change poses a threat to all of humanity and yet, we as whole are failing in our duty to do anything about it because we all have our lives to live, don’t we? 

See Also: Why our brains are wired to ignore climate change and what to do about it

(via mapsontheweb)

explore-blog:

Charming visualization from this altogether delightful children’s book about space – an imaginative and illuminating primer on the cosmos to spark awe in the souls of budding Sagans. 

Brilliant!

explore-blog:

Charming visualization from this altogether delightful children’s book about space – an imaginative and illuminating primer on the cosmos to spark awe in the souls of budding Sagans. 

Brilliant!

guardian:

Which countries are responsible for climate change?
Country sizes show the eventual CO₂ emissions from oil, coal and gas extracted each year. Many of these fuels are exported rather than used domestically, but arguably the countries extracting and selling fossil fuels bear a degree of responsibility for the resulting emissions.
See who is most vulnerable to global warming’s impacts »

This animated maps does a really good job of putting all the numbers associated with climate change in context. Set aside a few minutes and take a look. 

guardian:

Which countries are responsible for climate change?

Country sizes show the eventual CO₂ emissions from oil, coal and gas extracted each year. Many of these fuels are exported rather than used domestically, but arguably the countries extracting and selling fossil fuels bear a degree of responsibility for the resulting emissions.

See who is most vulnerable to global warming’s impacts »

This animated maps does a really good job of putting all the numbers associated with climate change in context. Set aside a few minutes and take a look. 

India’s first Mars satellite ‘Mangalyaan’ enters orbit

The Mangalyaan probe will now set about taking pictures of the planet and studying its atmosphere.
One key goal is to try to detect methane in the Martian air, which could be an indicator of biological activity at, or more likely just below, the surface.

It is great that my country’s space agency, ISRO has successfully achieved this feat first time around - but as an avid Science enthusiast i’m far more more interested in the “SCIENCE” part of the mission than its geopolitical implications. Geopolitics looks utterly mundane when one looks through Science-coloured glasses. 
I’m also looking looking forward to the kind of knock-on effects this mission will inevitably have on the youth of the country. 

India’s first Mars satellite ‘Mangalyaan’ enters orbit

The Mangalyaan probe will now set about taking pictures of the planet and studying its atmosphere.

One key goal is to try to detect methane in the Martian air, which could be an indicator of biological activity at, or more likely just below, the surface.

It is great that my country’s space agency, ISRO has successfully achieved this feat first time around - but as an avid Science enthusiast i’m far more more interested in the “SCIENCE” part of the mission than its geopolitical implications. Geopolitics looks utterly mundane when one looks through Science-coloured glasses. 

I’m also looking looking forward to the kind of knock-on effects this mission will inevitably have on the youth of the country. 

BBC News - World leaders gather for ‘crucial’ UN climate meeting

Colour me cynical……After decades of inaction and finger-pointing it is only natural to expect more of the same from this meeting. I don’t foresee any definitive CHANGE on this front over the course of this decade either. 😡 The only thing that’ll CHANGE however is the climate of our only home in the cosmos. 😞

BBC News - World leaders gather for ‘crucial’ UN climate meeting

Colour me cynical……After decades of inaction and finger-pointing it is only natural to expect more of the same from this meeting. I don’t foresee any definitive CHANGE on this front over the course of this decade either. 😡 The only thing that’ll CHANGE however is the climate of our only home in the cosmos. 😞

Largest Climate-Change March in History Unlikely to Convince Idiots

This one the best satirical columns i’ve read in some time. Brilliant and to the point.

kidsneedscience:

Today is the birthday of Jean Bernard Léon Foucault, born in 1821 to a publisher in Paris. In addition to defining and inventing the Foucault pendulum, Foucault is credited with naming the gyroscope. But first, the pendulum. Since the time of Galileo who defined the laws governing the motion of pendulums, but Foucault was the first to use the pendulum to show the rotation of the earth independent of celestial observation. Before he was thirty he devised an experiment to measure the speed of light. Today he is known more for the pendulum that bears his name than any of his other achievements. The word pendulum is a New Latin neuter of the noun pendulus meaning hanging down from the verb pendere meaning to hang. Image of a Foucault pendulum at the Pantheon in Paris.

I had no idea about Foucault coming up with the name Gyroscope. 

kidsneedscience:

Today is the birthday of Jean Bernard Léon Foucault, born in 1821 to a publisher in Paris. In addition to defining and inventing the Foucault pendulum, Foucault is credited with naming the gyroscope. But first, the pendulum. Since the time of Galileo who defined the laws governing the motion of pendulums, but Foucault was the first to use the pendulum to show the rotation of the earth independent of celestial observation. Before he was thirty he devised an experiment to measure the speed of light. Today he is known more for the pendulum that bears his name than any of his other achievements. The word pendulum is a New Latin neuter of the noun pendulus meaning hanging down from the verb pendere meaning to hang.
Image of a Foucault pendulum at the Pantheon in Paris.

I had no idea about Foucault coming up with the name Gyroscope. 

2014 winners : Astronomy Photographer of the Year

The winners of the Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2014 has been announced. Check them out! 

My 2nd contribution to SciNote touches on a controversial way of extracting fossil fuels. 
scinote:

What is Fracking? How Is It Dangerous?

Fracking has been a hot-button issue among policy-makers, scientists, environmentalists, and the general public alike. But what exactly is fracking?
Fracking, or “hydraulic fracturing”, is a way of extracting the oil or gas that’s embedded in subterranean rocks. It’s achieved by forcing liquid— usually water— through the fissures of those rocks at high pressure.
Jaime Trosper over at From Quark to Quasars provides a good overview of this process. She then answers a lot of questions about fracking, such as:
Does fracking makes economic sense? 
Does it harm the environment?
Does it endanger the communities that live around fracking sites?
Does fracking harm the workers involved in the process?
Click on the image above to read Jamie’s article.

Submitted by Srikar D., Discoverer
Edited by Ashlee R.

My 2nd contribution to SciNote touches on a controversial way of extracting fossil fuels. 

scinote:

What is Fracking? How Is It Dangerous?

Fracking has been a hot-button issue among policy-makers, scientists, environmentalists, and the general public alike. But what exactly is fracking?

Fracking, or “hydraulic fracturing”, is a way of extracting the oil or gas that’s embedded in subterranean rocks. It’s achieved by forcing liquid— usually water— through the fissures of those rocks at high pressure.

Jaime Trosper over at From Quark to Quasars provides a good overview of this process. She then answers a lot of questions about fracking, such as:

  • Does fracking makes economic sense? 
  • Does it harm the environment?
  • Does it endanger the communities that live around fracking sites?
  • Does fracking harm the workers involved in the process?

Click on the image above to read Jamie’s article.

Submitted by Srikar D., Discoverer

Edited by Ashlee R.