Reticent

This Blog is written and curated by an 'Oddball' named Srikar.

#Science

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo
The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.
Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?
(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

I don’t know about delicious (since i’m a vegetarian) but they do a much better job of maintaining an ecosystem than us human beings. 

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo

The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.

Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?

(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

I don’t know about delicious (since i’m a vegetarian) but they do a much better job of maintaining an ecosystem than us human beings. 

The First Spacewalk: Moments from disaster »

How Alexie Leonov, the first human to Spacewalk nearly lost his life while trying to do so and create history. This gripping BBC News Magazine story is a mix of text, audio, and video. As usual the Soviets did their best to hide the unsavoury bits of mission.

mindblowingscience:

What is the Evidence for Evolution?

Youtube user Stated Clearly investigates the multiple lines of evidence for evolution by showcasing Cetacean Evolution. Very easy to understand and informative.

This video is for those who are yet to study about the Theory of Evolotion or for those who staunchly refuse to believe in it. 

Really worth a watch if you are scientifically curious. 

scinote:

From Assembly to Launch Pad: MAVEN

Recently, NASA’s MAVEN (Mars Orbiter and Volatile Evolution) spacecraft went into orbit around Mars. MAVEN was designed to enable scientists to study Mars’ upper atmosphere. MAVEN’s goal is to allow us to better understand the history of the Martian atmosphere, how the climate has changed over time, and how that has influenced the evolution of the surface and the potential habitability of the planet.
MAVEN was launched from Cape Canaveral in November 2013. It takes years and hundreds of millions of dollars to build a spacecraft like this, so nothing is left to chance. MAVEN had to clear a lot of hurdles before it made it to the launch pad.
The test protocols for a spacecraft like this are meticulously designed to simulate every stage of the mission. It is far better to discover a problem in the factory than on the launch pad (or post-launch!), so these tests allow the engineers to diagnose and fix any hardware or software problems that would have otherwise come up during the business end of the mission.  
Click on this link to find out more about some of those tests.

Submitted by Srikar D., Discoverer.
Edited by Mark S.

scinote:

From Assembly to Launch Pad: MAVEN

RecentlyNASA’s MAVEN (Mars Orbiter and Volatile Evolution) spacecraft went into orbit around Mars. MAVEN was designed to enable scientists to study Mars’ upper atmosphere. MAVEN’s goal is to allow us to better understand the history of the Martian atmosphere, how the climate has changed over time, and how that has influenced the evolution of the surface and the potential habitability of the planet.

MAVEN was launched from Cape Canaveral in November 2013. It takes years and hundreds of millions of dollars to build a spacecraft like this, so nothing is left to chance. MAVEN had to clear a lot of hurdles before it made it to the launch pad.

The test protocols for a spacecraft like this are meticulously designed to simulate every stage of the mission. It is far better to discover a problem in the factory than on the launch pad (or post-launch!), so these tests allow the engineers to diagnose and fix any hardware or software problems that would have otherwise come up during the business end of the mission.  

Click on this link to find out more about some of those tests.

Submitted by Srikar D., Discoverer.

Edited by Mark S.