Reticent

Posts tagged “Science”

kidsneedscience:

Today is the birthday of Jean Bernard Léon Foucault, born in 1821 to a publisher in Paris. In addition to defining and inventing the Foucault pendulum, Foucault is credited with naming the gyroscope. But first, the pendulum. Since the time of Galileo who defined the laws governing the motion of pendulums, but Foucault was the first to use the pendulum to show the rotation of the earth independent of celestial observation. Before he was thirty he devised an experiment to measure the speed of light. Today he is known more for the pendulum that bears his name than any of his other achievements. The word pendulum is a New Latin neuter of the noun pendulus meaning hanging down from the verb pendere meaning to hang. Image of a Foucault pendulum at the Pantheon in Paris.

I had no idea about Foucault coming up with the name Gyroscope. 

kidsneedscience:

Today is the birthday of Jean Bernard Léon Foucault, born in 1821 to a publisher in Paris. In addition to defining and inventing the Foucault pendulum, Foucault is credited with naming the gyroscope. But first, the pendulum. Since the time of Galileo who defined the laws governing the motion of pendulums, but Foucault was the first to use the pendulum to show the rotation of the earth independent of celestial observation. Before he was thirty he devised an experiment to measure the speed of light. Today he is known more for the pendulum that bears his name than any of his other achievements. The word pendulum is a New Latin neuter of the noun pendulus meaning hanging down from the verb pendere meaning to hang.
Image of a Foucault pendulum at the Pantheon in Paris.

I had no idea about Foucault coming up with the name Gyroscope. 

2014 winners : Astronomy Photographer of the Year

The winners of the Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2014 has been announced. Check them out! 

My 2nd contribution to SciNote touches on a controversial way of extracting fossil fuels. 
scinote:

What is Fracking? How Is It Dangerous?

Fracking has been a hot-button issue among policy-makers, scientists, environmentalists, and the general public alike. But what exactly is fracking?
Fracking, or “hydraulic fracturing”, is a way of extracting the oil or gas that’s embedded in subterranean rocks. It’s achieved by forcing liquid— usually water— through the fissures of those rocks at high pressure.
Jaime Trosper over at From Quark to Quasars provides a good overview of this process. She then answers a lot of questions about fracking, such as:
Does fracking makes economic sense? 
Does it harm the environment?
Does it endanger the communities that live around fracking sites?
Does fracking harm the workers involved in the process?
Click on the image above to read Jamie’s article.

Submitted by Srikar D., Discoverer
Edited by Ashlee R.

My 2nd contribution to SciNote touches on a controversial way of extracting fossil fuels. 

scinote:

What is Fracking? How Is It Dangerous?

Fracking has been a hot-button issue among policy-makers, scientists, environmentalists, and the general public alike. But what exactly is fracking?

Fracking, or “hydraulic fracturing”, is a way of extracting the oil or gas that’s embedded in subterranean rocks. It’s achieved by forcing liquid— usually water— through the fissures of those rocks at high pressure.

Jaime Trosper over at From Quark to Quasars provides a good overview of this process. She then answers a lot of questions about fracking, such as:

  • Does fracking makes economic sense? 
  • Does it harm the environment?
  • Does it endanger the communities that live around fracking sites?
  • Does fracking harm the workers involved in the process?

Click on the image above to read Jamie’s article.

Submitted by Srikar D., Discoverer

Edited by Ashlee R.

The chemistry of Smartphones: What’s in your iPhone?

Spoiler! It is not just Aluminium, plastic, glass, and Silicon.

What is actually in one drop of blood?

scinote:

image

Question:

What is actually in one drop of blood?

Asked bybugs2015

Answer:

Quite a lot, it turns out!

In each drop of blood,roughly 60% is plasma, a liquid containing proteins, nutrients, hormones, and waste products— you know, all the things that blood is so famous for carrying around— dissolved in water.

The other 40% of your blood is made of cells. The most abundant are oxygen-bearing red blood cells (orerythrocytes, if you can pronounce that).Each drop of blood contains around 5 million red blood cells!

But red blood cells aren’t the only cells in that drop of blood. You’ll also find7,000 to 24,000 white blood cells, orleukocytes, which play a key role in your immune system’s ability to protect your body from infection and fight off disease.  There are also around 250,000 platelets, orthrombocytes, which promote blood clotting. should you be bleeding anywhere in your body.

Want to learn more? Trythis videofrom Khan Academy, or check outthis site. Thanks for your question!

Answered by Claire R., Expert Leader.

Edited by Dylan S.

SciNote is quickly become one of my favourite Science blogs. Excellent stuff. 

This world would be much better place if everybody thought like this. 

This world would be much better place if everybody thought like this. 

(via sciencealert)

Real-time map of aurora borealis

mindblowingscience:

Hey guys, I just found out that the NOAA space weather prediction centre has a real time map of the aurora’s that are going on right now due to the X-class solar flare from the sun.

It shows the areas that the aurora is visible from and is updated every 30 seconds.

There is also a map for the south pole.

Enjoy!

WOW! I didn’t have a clue about this resource. Kudos to Tynan Plillips for the find. 

David Bromley has lived with prosopagnosia for the past 15 years, since a brain haemorrhage left him unable to recognise faces. He looks in the mirror and sees himself before the injury. He sees himself on TV and thinks, “Who’s that old man”. Prosopagnosia has just been recognised by Britain’s National Health Service as a condition. Julian Keane spoke to David Bromley on Newsday.

scinote:

Just how big is the Sun?

The Sun is large enough that approximately 1.3 million Earths could fit inside, if squashed in. If the Earths retain their spherical shape, 960,000 Earths would fit.
But can you visualize that number of Earths?
Click on the picture above to see what 1.3 million Earths look like.

Submitted by space-facts
Edited by Margaret G.

scinote:

Just how big is the Sun?

The Sun is large enough that approximately 1.3 million Earths could fit inside, if squashed in. If the Earths retain their spherical shape, 960,000 Earths would fit.

But can you visualize that number of Earths?

Click on the picture above to see what 1.3 million Earths look like.

Submitted by space-facts

Edited by Margaret G.

ucresearch:

Seeing a supernovae within hours of the explosion
For the first time ever, scientists have gathered direct evidence of a rare Wolf-Rayet star being linked to a specific type of stellar explosion known as a Type IIb supernova. Peter Nugent of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory says they caught this star – a whopping 360 million light years away – just a few hours after it exploded.
Hear more about this discovery →

WOW! This is a great discovery. 

ucresearch:

Seeing a supernovae within hours of the explosion

For the first time ever, scientists have gathered direct evidence of a rare Wolf-Rayet star being linked to a specific type of stellar explosion known as a Type IIb supernova. Peter Nugent of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory says they caught this star – a whopping 360 million light years away – just a few hours after it exploded.

Hear more about this discovery →

WOW! This is a great discovery.