Chandra Observatory: 15 Years of Glorious Pictures

This is one of those rare slide-shows that is worth your time. All the pictures are just great. 

Happy July 4

July 4 is not just a special day for the Americans, it is also a special day for Physics and for Science in general. The discovery of Higgs Boson was announced at CERN 2 years ago today.

So, happy Independence day to all those in the United States, and Happy Higgs Boson day to all the Physicists, Scientists, and Science students and enthusiasts around the world. 

P.S. I was looking through July 4 events list on Wikipedia and i realised that July has been a good day for science on more than one occasion.

futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper. 

futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.

pbh3:

The planets, aligned.

This one is a keeper. 

In less than 100 seconds, Particle physicist John Dainton argues the importance of giving academics the freedom to explore their intellectual curiosities. 

Bottom line: Our modern world ceases to exist without a sound understanding of fundamental science. 

The James Webb Space Telescope described by Peter Cullen (by NASA)

A short video that answers the question: Why is NASA building the James Webb Telescope? 

Another one of those great posts that combines sports and science. It is combination of technique, material science and some basic physics.

The Chemistry of the World Cup Football | Compound Interest

Delightful read. I like these kinds of posts that combine my two favourite passions: Sports and Science. There’s more a FIFA World Cup ball than just its shape and its looks.

See Also: Pakistan May Not Have Made The World Cup Cut, But The Ball Is Another Story

Think Particle accelerators are just big, glorious (and expensive) toys for scientists? Think again. This piece is just seriously awesome.

badsciencejokes:

Science!!!

These points hold true for all walks of life and professions.  

(via asapscience)

A new study says when it comes to pollution on the roads, scooters are a thousand times worse than anything on four wheels. Dr Markus Kalberer from the University of Cambridge is one of the scientists behind the research.

The results are really counterintuitive. 

There is a plant, called Welwitschia mirabilis (mirabilis being Latin for marvelous), found only one place on earth, in a desert in Namibia. When you finally get to see one, sits apart. It’s very alone. All its relatives, its cousins, nieces, nephews have died away. It is the last remaining plant in its genus, the last in its family, the last in its order. “No other organism on earth can lay such a claim to being ‘one of its kind,’ ” writes biologist Richard Fortey.

explore-blog:

What causes those delicious before- and after-rain smells. Pair with the science of smell, the most direct yet mysterious of our senses.

(via It’s Okay To Be Smart)

I learnt something new today. 

colchrishadfield:

We are stardust, made of the stuff of dying suns. NASA simulates our basic building blocks. Scientists at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California have developed a way of recreating the dust and gas found around dying red giant stars that eventually become planet-forming interstellar dust.: http://www.gizmag.com/interstellar-dust-planet-formation-nasa/31957/

This is such a fascinating research project. Who knew we could gleam such fascinating insights from humble dust grains? 

Photographer Rose-Lynn Fisher was surprised to discover that some of the tears actually looked like aerial shots. All the water, proteins, minerals, hormones, antibodies and enzymes in the tear mimicked the rivers and fields and buildings you see while flying several thousand feet in the air.