Happy July 4

July 4 is not just a special day for the Americans, it is also a special day for Physics and for Science in general. The discovery of Higgs Boson was announced at CERN 2 years ago today.

So, happy Independence day to all those in the United States, and Happy Higgs Boson day to all the Physicists, Scientists, and Science students and enthusiasts around the world. 

P.S. I was looking through July 4 events list on Wikipedia and i realised that July has been a good day for science on more than one occasion.

In less than 100 seconds, Particle physicist John Dainton argues the importance of giving academics the freedom to explore their intellectual curiosities. 

Bottom line: Our modern world ceases to exist without a sound understanding of fundamental science. 

Another one of those great posts that combines sports and science. It is combination of technique, material science and some basic physics.

Think Particle accelerators are just big, glorious (and expensive) toys for scientists? Think again. This piece is just seriously awesome.

Humans are step closer to true Quantum Computing but this research can improve current technologies like Encryption and optical fibers as well.

Want to know which elementary particle best describes you? Well this interactive quiz will show you based on your input.

P.S. W plus, Z, and Gluons describe me the best according to this interactive.

Even the supremely smart people like Einstein made mistakes. But the great thing about them is that they learn form them.

What Stephen Hawking Really Said About Black Holes (by SciShow)

There has been a lot misinformation and hype surrounding this subject so this video by Hank of Scishow explains the ‘real’ science behind recent reports.

Physicists are building a nano engine that runs on a single atom and will arguably be the most efficient ever made.

10 Stories to read this weekend - Jan 31, 2014

My recommendations for this week:

Have a great weekend!

Andri pol takes a look inside CERN’s swiss headquarters

‘inside CERN – european organization for nuclear research’, a book recently published by Lars Müller, includes a wide selection of photographs, taken by andri pol, which offer a unique insight into life at the company and a glimpse into the lives of the characters behind one of the world’s most scientifically complex institutions.

Click on the link to see further details, as well as a review of the book. 

Random Fact of the Day: The first credible explanation for the blue colour of the sky was put forward by the Nobel Laureate and British physicist Lord Rayleigh (a.k.a. John William Strutt) in 1871. 
Bonus Fact: Lord Rayleigh is perhaps best known for co-discovering the noble gas, Argon with William Ramsey. He was awarded the Noble Prize for Physics in 1904 for this and related work.   

Random Fact of the Day: The first credible explanation for the blue colour of the sky was put forward by the Nobel Laureate and British physicist Lord Rayleigh (a.k.a. John William Strutt) in 1871. 

Bonus Fact: Lord Rayleigh is perhaps best known for co-discovering the noble gas, Argon with William Ramsey. He was awarded the Noble Prize for Physics in 1904 for this and related work.