futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper. 

futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.

pbh3:

The planets, aligned.

This one is a keeper. 

americasgreatoutdoors:

Happy 150th to Yosemite National Park! Share this photo to wish them a very happy birthday!

Photo: Kevin Perez (www.sharetheexperience.org)

WOW! Great shot. 

TIME have done a really good job with this one. Great stuff! 

10 stories to read this weekend - June 27, 2014

“Curiosity is, in great and generous minds, the first passion and the last.”  ― Samuel Johnson

Welcome to “10 stories to read this weekend,” a weekly feature that links to some interesting stories. 

  • How life transformed the planet: We may think we are the first organisms to remake the planet, but life has been transforming the earth for aeons.
  • Secrets of the Creative Brain: A leading neuroscientist who has spent decades studying creativity shares her research on where genius comes from, whether it is dependent on high IQ—and why it is so often accompanied by mental illness. 
  • Meet the Elusive Man Responsible for Today’s Middle East Mayhem: Lieutenant Muhammad Sharif Al-Faruqi, may very well be one of the greatest impostors in the history of international relations.
  • Baptism by Fire: A New York Firefighter Confronts His First Test: This interactive feature from the New York Times follows Jordan Sullivan, whose decade-long dream of joining the Fire Department had come true. Now he had to prove himself.
  • David Sedaris: Living the Fitbit Life: I look back on the days I averaged only thirty thousand steps, and think, Honestly, how lazy can you get?
  • Rolling Nowhere, Part Two: Father and son bond by hopping freight trains.
  • Why We Play: Doing what we love, despite the risks: Examining the allure of dangerous sports.
  • Coming of Age: Sixteen years after his first World Cup experience as a lonely U.S. supporter, the author traveled with his star-spangled buddies to this year’s Cup in Brazil and discovered the brave new world of American soccer fandom
  • The Beautiful, Invisible Game: And how technology can help or hurt our ability to understand the sport.
  • Descent: The rise and fall of Lance Armstrong is not simply a story of one man’s moral failures. To understand Armstrong you have to understand the people who use their money and power to shape the culture of competitive sports. And if you follow the trail of money and power in this particular case, it will lead you to Thomas Weisel, which is where the real story begins.

The time for second chances is over at 2014 FIFA World Cup. So i’ll be have a ball watching all the action from the from the round of 16 this weekend and and i hope you do so as well. Have a great weekend! 

10 stories to read this weekend - June 20, 2014

“The greatest gift is a passion for reading. It is cheap, it consoles, it distracts, it excites, it gives you knowledge of the world and experience of a wide kind. It is a moral illumination.” - Elizabeth Hardwick.

Welcome to “10 stories to read this weekend,” a weekly feature that links to some interesting stories. 

Have a great weekend! 

In less than 100 seconds, Particle physicist John Dainton argues the importance of giving academics the freedom to explore their intellectual curiosities. 

Bottom line: Our modern world ceases to exist without a sound understanding of fundamental science. 

“Was Spain’s inability to anticipate and adapt to the changing realities a classic case of Innovator’s dilemma?”
— Did Spain stick to tiki-taka style of Football for far too long? 

Tumblr’s David Karp on Why He Doesn’t Regret the Yahoo! Sale & Empowering Creators-WIRED BizCon (by WIRED)

The James Webb Space Telescope described by Peter Cullen (by NASA)

A short video that answers the question: Why is NASA building the James Webb Telescope? 

Another one of those great posts that combines sports and science. It is combination of technique, material science and some basic physics.

Jason Hirschhorn has put together a truly fascinating collection of reads related to Football/Soccer. What a great list! I’d read a few of them previously but i found a lot of gems in this piece in addition to that.

P.S. If you’re not a subscriber of the venerable Jason Hirshhorn’s Media Re-defined newsletter then you’re doing yourself a huge disservice.

10 stories to read this weekend - June 13, 2014

“To truly know the world, look deeply within your own being; to truly know yourself, take real interest in the world.” - Rudolf Steiner

Welcome to “10 stories to read this weekend,” a weekly feature where i share some interesting and intriguing stories every friday. 

  • The Curious Passions of Mr. CosmosNeil deGrasse Tyson On Space, Climate, and Why Curiosity Wins Every Time.
  • Consider the Can: You drink your beer; you toss the container. Do you know it comes back? How economics and design, laws and lobbying, craft and ingenuity, recycling theory and recycling myth, the nature of aluminum and the nature of capitalism, and grueling, endless, human labor all shape the can’s strange and eternal circle of life.What do you think?
  • Can Neuroscientists Rewrite Our Traumatic MemoriesMemories come in many forms. Implicit, procedural memories—how we ride a bike, tie our shoes, make an omelette—are distributed throughout the brain. Emotional memories, like fear and love, are stored in the amygdala, an almond-shaped set of neurons situated deep in the temporal lobe, behind the eyes. Conscious, visual memories—the date of a doctor’s appointment, the names of the Presidents—reside in the hippocampus, which also processes information about context. It takes effort to bring those memories to the surface of awareness. Each of us has memories that we wish we could erase, and memories that we cannot summon no matter how hard we try.
  • Being Happy With Sugar: Popular media are full of dramatic claims that sugar is toxic. And there’s intense disagreement about recommendations to replace table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup with “natural” sweeteners like agave nectar or fruit juice. What to make of it all?
  • Are halophytes the crop of the future?We are running out of land for traditional agriculture. Time to figure out what saltwater plants can do for us
  • Sun and Shadows: How an Island Paradise Became a Haven for Dirty Money (via LongForm.org)
  • Children of the occupation: growing up in Palestine: Nawal Jabarin wants to be a doctor when she grows up. For now, she lives in a cave with 14 siblings, in constant fear of military raids. We meet the Palestinian children living under Israeli occupation. (See Also: Israeli soldiers speak out about brutality of Palestinian occupation.) 
  • Brazil’s billion-dollar gym experiment: Can a grand vision of 4,000 free public gyms overcome inequality and fight Brazil’s health crisis?
  • Spokesman of the Slums: In the midst of fierce battles between drug kingpins and police, one tweeting teenager emerges as the most reliable reporter from inside Brazil’s infamous favelas.
  • How To Catch A Chess Cheater: Ken Regan Finds Moves Out Of Mind: A ubiquitous Internet combined with button-sized wireless communications devices and chess programs that can easily wipe out the world champion make the temptation today to use hi-tech assistance in rated chess greater than ever. (via Alexis C. Madrigal / The Atlantic)

Bonus Reads: The Beautiful GameNarratively has put out a timely collection of stories to mark the beginning of 2014 FIFA World cup. I’m a big football/soccer fan so i really enjoyed the stories. Hope you enjoy all the action from Brazil over the next 30 days. My loyalties as always are firmly behind England but i don’t expect them to go all way. A top-4 finish will a great achievement. 

Have a great weekend! 

The Chemistry of the World Cup Football | Compound Interest

Delightful read. I like these kinds of posts that combine my two favourite passions: Sports and Science. There’s more a FIFA World Cup ball than just its shape and its looks.

See Also: Pakistan May Not Have Made The World Cup Cut, But The Ball Is Another Story

Think Particle accelerators are just big, glorious (and expensive) toys for scientists? Think again. This piece is just seriously awesome.

The Brazilian Stadiums Where The World Cup Will Be Decided | TIME

These are the 11 soccer stadiums, both old and newly constructed, where 32 teams will battle it out for the chance to win the FIFA World Cup trophy.

This slideshow is worth a look. 

Related: How to Put All the World Cup Games on Your Calendar