micdotcom:

The crisis in Gaza is so serious, it can be seen from space

International Space Station astronaut Alexander Gerst has posted his “saddest photo yet.” From all the way up in the thermosphere, ISS personnel orbiting 200 miles over the Middle East can see bombs and missiles exploding in Gaza and Israel as the two sides go to war.
Detailed explanation of the photo | Follow micdotcom 


This latest crisis is so disappointing.  micdotcom:

The crisis in Gaza is so serious, it can be seen from space

International Space Station astronaut Alexander Gerst has posted his “saddest photo yet.” From all the way up in the thermosphere, ISS personnel orbiting 200 miles over the Middle East can see bombs and missiles exploding in Gaza and Israel as the two sides go to war.
Detailed explanation of the photo | Follow micdotcom 


This latest crisis is so disappointing. 

micdotcom:

The crisis in Gaza is so serious, it can be seen from space

International Space Station astronaut Alexander Gerst has posted his “saddest photo yet.” From all the way up in the thermosphere, ISS personnel orbiting 200 miles over the Middle East can see bombs and missiles exploding in Gaza and Israel as the two sides go to war.

Detailed explanation of the photo | Follow micdotcom 

This latest crisis is so disappointing. 

(via heythereuniverse)

“Do you know what people want more than anything? They want to be missed. They want to be missed the day they don’t show up. They want to be missed when they’re gone.”

In another excellent episode of NPR’s TED Radio Hour, Seth Godin dispenses some of his signature wisdom in discussing what makes a great leader. (David Foster Wallace had similar ideas.)

Pair with Godin on vulnerability, creative courage, and how to dance with the fear.

(via explore-blog)

10 stories to read this weekend - July 25, 2014

“To acquire the habit of reading is to construct for yourself a refuge from almost all the miseries of life.” W. Somerset Maugham. 

Welcome to “10 stories to read this weekend,” a weekly feature that links to some interesting stories.

  • How the Israel-Palestine Peace Deal Died: The Explosive, Inside Story of How John Kerry Built an Israel-Palestine Peace Plan—and Watched It Crumble.
  • Lessons From America’s War for the Greater Middle East: A historical look at how the United States ended up waging war in the Middle East—starting with Jimmy Carter more than 30 years ago—and how they continue to misunderstand what “winning” even means.
  • In the Heart of Mysterious Oman: With the Gulf region, and much of the greater Middle East, entangled in civil strife and sectarian divisions, Oman looks increasingly like an anomaly. Dominated by formidable mountains and huge tracts of uninhabited gravelly desert, the country has a population of four million people dispersed across a territory the size of Italy. It is sandwiched between Saudi Arabia and the hinterlands of Yemen, in which al-Qaeda has much influence. And its government is one of the most absolutist in the world.
  • Fighting A One-Of-A-Kind Disease: What do you do if your child has a condition that is new to science?
  • Brain Games: Climate Change and the Santa Fe Institute: High in the hills of New Mexico, USA the Santa Fe Institute wrestles with some of today’s toughest questions, but can the world’s leading scientists solve climate change?
  • Dude, Where’s My Frontal Cortex? There’s a method to the madness of the teenage brain.
  • Kim Philby, Spies, and the Dangers of Paranoia: In the world of espionage, is it better to trust too much or too little?
  • The German officer who tried to kill Hitler: On 20 July 1944, a 36-year-old German army officer, Col Claus Schenk Graf von Stauffenberg, arrived at a heavily guarded complex hidden in a forest in East Prussia. His mission was to kill Adolf Hitler.
  • Arctic Man: Wild rides and crazed nights at America’s most extreme ski race: It’s April in Alaska so the traffic on the Glenn Highway can’t be blamed on either winter snow or summer tourists. The line of yellowing motorhomes, bulbous camper trailers, jacked-up pickups and shopworn Subarus inching out of Wasilla onto the hairpins and steep climbs of the Glenn is, as the bumper stickers say, “Alaska Grown,” the annual migration of the state’s Sledneck population to Arctic Man.
  • How many Greek legends were really true? The culture and legends of ancient Greece have a remarkably long legacy in the modern language of education, politics, philosophy, art and science. Classical references from thousands of years ago continue to appear. But what was the origin of some of these ideas?

Bonus Reads: 

Wish you all a great weekend! 

Chandra Observatory: 15 Years of Glorious Pictures

This is one of those rare slide-shows that is worth your time. All the pictures are just great. 

“Were the middle classes to donate an average of 1% of their annual spending to charity by 2030, they would contribute an estimated $550 billion to civil society per year.”

Philanthropy as an Emerging Contributor to Development Cooperation | UNDP

WOW! Just a tiny fraction can make a big difference to this world filled with inequality.

10 stories to read this weekend - July 18, 2014

“It is well to read everything of something, and something of everything.” - Lord Henry P. Brougham

Welcome to “10 stories to read this weekend,” a weekly feature that links to some interesting stories.

I’m starting this week’s edition with a bonus read: How to Be a Better Online Reader by Maria Konnikova.

Here are this week’s picks: 

  • The Organ Detective: Hidden Global Market in Human Flesh: Tracking the organ trade, anthropologist Nancy Scheper-Hughes visited African and South American dialysis units, organ banks, police morgues, and hospitals. She interviewed surgeons, patient’s rights activists, pathologists, nephrologists, and nurses. So why aren’t more people listening to her?
  • Who gets shot in America: What I learned compiling records of carnage for the New York Times by Jennifer Mascia.
  • I Can’t Die Before My Son: After raising a severely autistic son to adulthood, a single mother’s brush with death raises the horrifying question of what will happen to him when she’s gone.
  • If Trauma Victims Forget, What Is Lost to Society? A pill to dampen memories stirs hope and worry.
  • Camp Lejeune and the U.S. Military’s Polluted Legacy: The U.S. military is supposed to protect this country’s citizens and soldiers, not poison them.
  • Why do we have blood types? More than a century after their discovery, we still don’t really know what blood types are for. Do they really matter? Carl Zimmer investigates.
  • The chaos and tangled energy of living cities: The urge to tidy up cities is deadening – let’s celebrate the tangled chaos and honky-tonk energy that keep them alive.
  • Ex-Apple Engineers Find Life After Jobs: A really good feature on ex-Apple engineers and what they’re doing now. Telling the whole world that you used to be big at Apple adds cachet, whether you’re applying for a new job or looking for investment money.
  • The Need for Speed: From horses to hyperloops, greater mobility is one of the deepest human drives and elicits some of our greatest innovations. Four basic instincts from the evolutionary story of humanity determine mobility across all different forms of transport. The first instinct is to stick to the budget of time of about one hour per day. The second instinct is to return to the home in the evening. The third instinct is to spend within the travel budget of about 12 to 15 percent of disposable income. The fourth instinct is to maximize range, and thus access to resources, within the limits imposed by time and money. These basic instincts help us make sense of the complex use that humans make of systems of transport.
  • Welcome to Utopia: On a remote island, a former airline executive and his wife are preparing for the world to end. Others are starting to join them.

Wish you all a good weekend! 

The most consistent footballing team of the 21st century finally have something to show for it. Germany become the 1st European team to win the FIFA World Cup in the Americas, not just Latin America. They won this World Cup because they played as one cohesive unit throughout the tournament. 

Yes, Mario Götze was individually brilliant when he scored the World Cup clinching goal but it was a team effort to get the ball to the business end. Team Work + Individual brilliance is an unbeatable combination.  Yes, Mario Götze was individually brilliant when he scored the World Cup clinching goal but it was a team effort to get the ball to the business end. Team Work + Individual brilliance is an unbeatable combination.  Yes, Mario Götze was individually brilliant when he scored the World Cup clinching goal but it was a team effort to get the ball to the business end. Team Work + Individual brilliance is an unbeatable combination. 

Yes, Mario Götze was individually brilliant when he scored the World Cup clinching goal but it was a team effort to get the ball to the business end. Team Work + Individual brilliance is an unbeatable combination. 

10 stories to read this weekend - July 11, 2014

“I always read. You know how sharks have to keep swimming or they die? I’m like that. If I stop reading, I die.” ― Patrick Rothfuss

Welcome to “10 stories to read this weekend,” a weekly feature that links to some interesting stories.

  • Ebola Virus: Nature’s Most Perfect Killing Machine: Ebola is nightmare fuel: a biological doomsday device conspiring with our bodies to murder us in uniquely gruesome fashion. It’s also killed fewer than 2,000 people. How has a virus with such a modest body count so fiercely captured the darkest corners of our imagination?
  • Behind the yellow door, a man’s mental illness worsens: A family struggles as a 42-year-old husband, father and son becomes increasingly isolated.
  • I learnt to survive like an 11th-century farmer: When my life came crashing down I took shelter on my farm, surviving with 11th-century tools like the sickle and scythe
  • Sana’a: American and Pinboard bookmarking service founder Maciej Ceglowski chronicles his time in the capital city of Yemen — A gripping piece.
  • The errors in my answer to Darwin: With his genius for observation, Charles Darwin noticed a curious fact about colours that’s still little known to this day.
  • BBC News - Tour de France 2014: Keeping the Belkin team wheels turning: A behind the scenes look at a Tour de France team.
  • Lance in Purgatory: The After-Life: After a great fall, what do we remember? We remember the cheating, and the lies. We remember the cult of personality that we eagerly embraced, and then felt betrayed by. But what of the man who fell? What about the work he didn’t cheat at? What about the 16 years Lance Armstrong spent building a global cancer advocacy? Did it matter? Does it still? Does it matter that Livestrong, the foundation that kicked him out, now wants him back? Do we care what happens to the great work a man has done, after a great fall?
  • The Tech Industry vs. San Francisco: The tech industry made the Bay Area rich. Why do so many residents hate it?
  • What tech offices tell us about the future work: Twitter has log cabins and Facebook has graffiti — what do the offices of tech giants tell us about the future of work?
  • If Scotland Goes: Most English are “only just waking up” to the idea that the United Kingdom might “go poof” if Scotland votes for independence in September. Then what? “The Irish question would be reopened, as Northern Ireland’s status began to look increasingly anomalous”. England would need a new base for its nuclear submarines. But if Britain could absorb the loss of America in 1776, it can absorb the loss of Scotland of 2014.

Wish you all a great weekend! 

INSPECTING OS X YOSEMITE’S ICONS (via Inspecting Yosemite’s Icons)

This is a really good critique. This was a fun read.

10 stories to read this weekend - July 4, 2014

“Reading without reflecting is like eating without digesting.” ― Edmund Burke

Welcome to “10 stories to read this weekend,” a weekly feature that links to some interesting stories. 

  • The Real Red Line in the Middle East: If ISIS attacks Jordan, neither the United States nor Israel will be able to stay out of the fray.
  • The Disaster We’ve Wrought on the World’s Oceans May Be Irrevocable: Along the coasts and out in the deep, huge “dead zones” have been multiplying. They are the emptiest places on the planet, where there’s little oxygen and sometimes no life at all, almost entirely restricted to some unicellular organisms like bacteria. Vast blooms of algae—organisms that thrive in more acid (and less alkaline) seawater and are fed by pollution—have already rendered parts of the Baltic Sea pretty much dead. A third of the marine life in that sea, which once fed all of Northern Europe, is gone and may already be beyond hope of recovery.
  • Can tiny plankton help reverse climate change?: Once you know what plankton can do, you’ll understand why fertilising the ocean with iron is not such a crazy idea.
  • A Doctor’s Quest to Save People by Injecting Them With Scorpion Venom: This is such a beautiful piece.
  • How Terrorism Is Threatening African Elephants: The rise of terrorism and the weakness of governments in parts of Africa is putting elephants at risk of extinction after a quarter-century of successful conservation. See Also: The Race to Stop Africa’s Elephant Poachers: The recent capture of a notorious poacher has given hope to officials in Chad battling to save the African elephant from extinction.
  • Why New York Real Estate Is the New Swiss Bank Account: The New York real-estate market is now the premier destination for wealthy foreigners with rubles, yuan, and dollars to hide.
  • Beyond Belief: A Journey to Antarctica: MONTHS LATER, MY MEMORIES of that trip aren’t like my memories of other trips. They aren’t even like my other memories. There are no colors, no tall buildings, no roads or signs or music, no snapshots of indigenous faces, none of the usual time stamps given us by day and night. There was always light, the sun setting spectacularly before changing its mind at the last moment and rising again, true darkness just one more of Antarctica’s vast repertoire of apparitions. When I close my eyes, there are only shadows and blurs, a hundred shades of blue and white, snow and ice, sleeplessness and awe. I don’t really remember specific locations, and I can’t say I fully remember moments, even. I remember the gooseflesh and lumps in my throat.
  • What Dhaka, Bangladesh, the Traffic Capital of the World, Can Teach Us: It might not be as sexy as building schools or curing malaria, but alleviating traffic congestion is one of the defining development challenges of our time. Half the world’s population already lives in cities, and the United Nations estimates that proportion will rise to nearly 70 percent by 2050.
  • How the Chilean Miners Survived: How 33 Chilean miners survived for two months, a mile below ground, after their mine collapsed around them. Their rations: One can of salmon, one can of peaches, one can of peas, eighteen cans of tuna, twenty-four litres of milk (eight of which turned out to be spoiled), ninety-three packages of cookies, and ten litres of bottled water. “In exchange for good wages, the men accepted the possibility of death.”
  • How Scott Kazmir came back with the help of unconventional training:From ESPN Magazine’s feature on (now) Oakland Athletics’ pitcher and phenom-flameout Scott Kazmir’s comeback from baseball wilderness. A great read for anyone who is lost in modern world’s cacophony.” Om Malik

Wish you all a great weekend! 

Happy July 4

July 4 is not just a special day for the Americans, it is also a special day for Physics and for Science in general. The discovery of Higgs Boson was announced at CERN 2 years ago today.

So, happy Independence day to all those in the United States, and Happy Higgs Boson day to all the Physicists, Scientists, and Science students and enthusiasts around the world. 

P.S. I was looking through July 4 events list on Wikipedia and i realised that July has been a good day for science on more than one occasion.

A look at why the Brazilian fans inside Brazil’s football stadiums during the ongoing 2014 FIFA World Cup were mostly white and less diverse than the country at large.

futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper.  futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.
pbh3:

The planets, aligned.


This one is a keeper. 

futurist-foresight:

The planets - just because its a wonderful image.

pbh3:

The planets, aligned.

This one is a keeper. 

americasgreatoutdoors:

Happy 150th to Yosemite National Park! Share this photo to wish them a very happy birthday!

Photo: Kevin Perez (www.sharetheexperience.org)

WOW! Great shot.